Child sacrifice and traditional healers: Maama Fiina mu Parliament

There are a lot of grey areas when it comes to traditional healing and religions. As Maama Fiina rightly pointed out while in Parliament, the existing laws governing need to be revisited. The current law is the colonial Witchcraft Act 1957 and the practice has changed with the cash-based economy and several other factors. Her reasoning is of course self-preserving. Maama Fiina believes that there are several disingenuous practitioners who are there to swindle money while UCC said the law, especially Section 2, was vague.

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My aunt gave me some relationship advice

She will probably shake her head in mild disappointment if she finds out I shared this in a blogpost, but I’m taking the risk because my auntie gave me some sound advice. This is what she told me, as we stood in the middle of a sidestreet with her hand on my arm, holding me still so I would pay special attention because this was more important than everything else we could say while we walked.

Jennifer Makumbi’s next novel is “feminist with a capital F!”

Yes, I am working currently on a novel called Nnambi. I suspect that the title might change because while it plays with Nnambi the mythical figure, this is not her story and it is not in dialogue with the first novel but due to the oral traditions (as the first man and woman) there is a kind of conversation between the novels. The new novel is set between 1965 and 1983 without dealing with the history of the time. It is a feminist novel with capital F!

Feminists Call for Action on the Suspension of Pregnant University Students

It violates Article 21: Equality and freedom from discrimination of sex, privacy rights; Article 27: Right to privacy of person…, Clause 1 states that no person shall be subjected to (a) unlawful search of the person…They were found to be pregnant during random tests. What happened to the right to a fair hearing as spelt out in Article 28 of the National Constitution?

Oliver talks about women in Butabika hospital

Some of the issues that Oliver pointed out in the second part of his series that focused on the women admitted were dismaying.
“A woman came up to me and explained how she had been in the hospital for two weeks and wanted desperately to go home. She told me that on admission she was menstruating and she was still wearing the same underwear. “No washing your knickers. Why? Bloody, dirty knickers!” she said. All she wanted was some dignity and hygiene.”