Uganda’s new sex education framework will do more harm than good

Uganda has launched its first ever guideline on sex education. The National Sexuality Education Framework 2018 aims to provide a formal, national direction for sex education within Uganda’s schools, ensuring that all programmes adhere to the same approach

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On joining the Women’s March

Systems are supposed to be in place to protect the citizens that pay to keep them functional. Women need to know the murderers and kidnappers of our sisters and children are behind bars; and that we can walk without fear within these borders.

On the Front Pages

When it comes to news stories involving perceived LGBT individuals, the Ugandan media rarely seeks the facts of a case but instead engages in sensationalism.

Twinamatsiko, Kibuule: Uganda’s cycle of abuse

With their apologies, Ronald Kibuule and Onesmus Twinamatsiko did what every abuser does. And like all other incidents where women have had to accept apologies because we want to believe that they represent some kind of sign that the person understands what abuse is and will do something about it, in our private spaces, we have kept the same optimism.

NTV Men should explore issues of masculinity

NTV Men, a show on NTV Uganda has stirred some conversation on their choice of topic – in my opinion, not enough conversation. In its current state, the show spends too much airtime talking about women and calling on one woman to explain all the ways of women. Great topics devolve as a result.

Next steps to getting Africa’s protocol on women’s rights implemented

I would argue that to fully realise the rights set out in the Maputo Protocol, a separate institution needs to be established to oversee its implementation. An example of how this could work is already in place when it comes to children’s rights. Children are protected by the African Children’s Charter. The African Committee of Experts oversees implementation. Women need similar protection mechanisms.

Why Stanbic footage would not add to the bigger conversation

What is different this time? Ronald Kibuule, according to Hellen Obuku, invoked his office. He did not want to be searched because he is a Minister. The Stanbic CEO- who runs a bank that according to recent results, rose net profit by 56.9% to Shs107.29 billion- had time to apologise to him, likely because he is a Minister.

Kibuule also called the police. “But Kampala Metropolitan Police spokesman Emilian Kayima said Mr Kibuule called the police to “intervene in the case” at the bank. The Minister reportedly called the Mukono District police commander, Mr Alfred Ahimbisibwe, to arrest Obuku for criminal libel, a media-related offence. [Obuku is said to have “recollected herself and went back to her post and kept quiet.”]